Diagnostic Imaging Services

Bone densitometry, also called dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, DEXA or DXA, uses a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body (usually the lower (or lumbar) spine and hips) to measure bone loss. It is commonly used to diagnose osteoporosis, to assess an individual’s risk for developing osteoporotic fractures. DXA is simple, quick and noninvasive. It’s also the most commonly used and the most standard method for diagnosing osteoporosis.
This exam requires little to no special preparation. Tell your doctor and the technologist if there is a possibility you are pregnant or if you recently had a barium exam or received an injection of contrast material for a CT or radioisotope scan. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown. You should not take calcium supplements for at least 24 hours before your exam.

One in eight women, or 12%, will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime. Despite this fact, we can feel empowered by the opportunity that annual screening provides to detect breast cancer as early as possible. The evidence is clear that early detection of breast cancer improves the odds of survival.

The addition of tomosynthesis, or what is described as “3D” imaging, to standard two-view mammography improves the detection of breast lesions. We offer standard 2-view mammography in addition to tomosynthesis to every patient because we know what is at risk. It is so important for every female 40 years of age and older to undergo screening mammography that we do not require a physician’s order to perform your imaging. That’s right, all you need to do is call to make an appointment, no order required. There is nothing standing between you and your piece of mind, so please call 307-232-5054 and schedule your screening mammogram today.

When a lesion is found, our board certified radiologists will ensure that you are scheduled for the next stages of diagnosis. Imaging tests that you may require include specific mammographic views of the involved breast also known as a “diagnostic mammogram”, a breast ultrasound,a breast MRI, and potentially a biopsy.

When it comes to breast biopsies there are many ways to obtain enough tissue to help the pathologist make an accurate diagnosis. Breast lesions can be targeted with specific mammographic views (termed stereotactic breast biopsy), via ultrasound, and also by MRI.

Stereotactic breast biopsies are performed in compression, like a mammogram. Once the breast is in compression, images are acquired and the lesion is localized. The skin overlying the lesion is then cleansed, the skin and deeper tissues are numbed with local anesthesia, and a small incision (roughly the size of a pea) is made in the skin to allow the needle to pass. Once the needle is in place and the sample is obtained, a very small marker called a clip is left in the biopsy cavity to identify the biopsy location should more tissue need tobe removed at a later date. The skin is cleansed and a bandage is placed. Complications are rare and you can get back to your normal life immediately.

Ultrasound guided breast biopsies are performed without compression and use a small probe to locate the lesion. Once the lesion is localized the skin overlying the lesion is then cleansed, the skin and deeper tissues are numbed with local anesthesia, and a small incision (roughlythe size of a pea) is made in the skin to allow the needle to pass. Once the needle is in place and the sample is obtained, a very small marker called a clip is left in the biopsy cavity to identify the biopsy location should more tissue need to be removed at a later date. The skin is cleansed and a bandage is placed. Again, complications are rare and you can get back to your normal life immediately.

MRI guided breast biopsies are performed without compression, however the breast is placed into a special depression in the MRI table.Breast imaging and biospsies are performed in the prone position, laying on your front side and face down. A small plastic grid is placed on the side of the involved breast and images are taken without and with IV contrast. Once the lesion is localized the skin overlying the lesion is then cleansed, the skin and deeper tissues are numbed with local anesthesia, and a small incision (roughly the size of a pea) is made in the skin to allow the needle to pass. Once the needle is in place and the sample is obtained, a very small marker called a clip is left in the biopsy cavity to identify the biopsy location should more tissue need to be removed at a later date. The skin is cleansed and a bandage is placed. Again, complications are rare and you can get back to your normal life immediately.

Our team is here to serve you every step of the way from baseline screening through problem solving imaging and tissue acquisition. If you have questions, concerns, or would like to speak to a provider please do not hesitate to call 307-232-5054 and schedule an appointment today.

Computed tomography (CT) is a diagnostic imaging test used to create detailed images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images which can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to electronic media. CT scanning is often the best method for detecting many different cancers since the images allow your doctor to confirm the presence of a tumor and determine its size and location. CT is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives.

An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. A bone x-ray makes images of any bone in the body, including the hand, wrist, arm, elbow, shoulder, spine, pelvis, hip, thigh, knee, leg (shin), ankle or foot.
Chest x-ray uses a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the chest. It is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used to help diagnose shortness of breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It also may be used to help diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. Because chest x-ray is fast and easy, it is particularly useful in emergency diagnosis and treatment.

An x-ray procedure that makes it possible to see internal organs in motion. Fluoroscopy uses x-ray to produce real-time video images. After the x-rays pass through the patient. Examples of Fluoroscopic exams are UGI, Arthrograms, Barium Enema, and Voiding Cystourethrogram to name just a few.

More people in the United States die from lung cancer than any other type of cancer. Early detection can be life saving.

The only proven method of screening for lung cancer is by low dose CT.(10 minutes of your time, no needles, and no medications – it’s that easy!) We offer low dose lung cancer screening to every patient at risk for lung cancer.

There are 3 simple questions that only you can answer to determine if you are at risk.

  1. How many pack-years have you smoked? The math is simple. Multiply the number of packs you smoked per day by the number of years you smoked. For example, Mrs. Allen smoked 2 packs per day over 25 years. She has a (2 x 25) 50 pack-year smoking history. Mr. Jones smoked 1 pack per day for 30 years. He has a (1 x 30) 30 pack-year smoking history. If your number is 30 or more, you have a history of heavy smoking.
  2. Do you smoke now or have you quit within the last 15 years?
  3. Are you between 55 and 80 years old?

 

See? It’s that easy. 30 pack-year history of smoking, still smoke or quit within the past 15 years, and you’re between 55 and 80 years old. If that’s you, you should have an annual low dose lung CT scan to check for cancer.

75% of patients screened do not have lung cancer. For those that do, there are resources available to help you through your diagnosis.

Medicare, Medicaid, and most insurance carriers cover low dose lung cancer screening. If yours doesn’t, we can still offer you a scan and peace of mind.

Lung cancer low dose CT screening: It’s covered, it’s proven, and it’s simple to do.

Don’t be a statistic, act now and make your appointment today.

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We are excited to announce the opening of Outpatient Radiology’s new MRI Suite located at 1207 E. 2nd St.

The opening of this new suite means the latest MRI technology available in Casper. Outpatient Radiology’s new suite hosts two new, state-of-the-art 1.5 Tesla and 3 Tesla MRI units.

These large-bore MRI machines are equipped with the latest MRI technology. They will provide patients with the highest-quality imaging, with more comfort and in less time. This is good for patients and their physicians.

The large bore design of these machines means you’ll experience a more comfortable MRI, regardless of your size. The larger cylinder and the short depth of the machine give it a less claustrophobic feel, as much of your body-including your head-is actually out of the machine during many types of scans.

The high field strength means that our images are clear, accurate and fast. You spend less time in the scanner and more time getting on with your life. Our machines also allow for fast MRI results, letting us get the results of your scan back to your physician in usually less than 24 hours.

We also have available anesthesia for MRI for patients who may be claustrophobic, anxious, in pain, or unable to remain still for an examination.

Ultrasound imaging, also called sonography, involves exposing part of the body to high-frequency sound waves to produce pictures of the inside of the body. Ultrasound exams do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays). Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body’s internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels.

Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, flat sections of the body. Ultrasound examinations can help to diagnose and treat a variety of medical conditions and to assess organ damage following illness. Ultrasound is used to help physicians evaluate symptoms such as pain, swelling, and infection and is a useful way of examining many of the body’s internal organs.

Diagnostic Imaging Services

For more information or to schedule an appointment to discuss any of these procedures please follow the link below